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Rep. Susan Lynn tries to sell Haslam’s Gasolinazo

source: State Representative Susan Lynn’s Weekly Wrap

by Horatio Bunce

State Representative Susan Lynn has an email newsletter called the Weekly Wrap. She has recently taken time off from selling Gov. Haslam’s re-branding of Common Core in Tennessee to selling Gov. Haslam’s massive fuel tax increases called the IMPROVE Act, while ignoring the $2 BILLION surplus in over-taxation the state is currently burdened with. Rep. Lynn engages in some….interesting….mathematics in justifying Haslam’s fuel tax increase to declare it “pocketbook neutral”. Meanwhile the Transportation Department is, like the Common Core tactic that worked so well, simply renaming the massive tax increase measure the “Tax Cut Act of 2017“.

As Rep. Lynn insults our intelligence to a slightly lesser degree than “Boss” Doss, I’ll give her a pass as she is from The North™ and possibly thinks us dumb hillbillies would actually use Common Core Math. Since she asked, here’s my calculation on the “Tax Cut Act of 2017”. From her Weekly Wrap:

“Improve Act Close to Floor Vote

The House is close to voting on the Improve Act – I want to know what you think. Please email me to let me know.

“The Improve Act is revenue neutral and now pocketbook neutral for most people. It will lower the sales tax on food a full percent or $1 for each $100 you spend at the store. It will also lower the Hall Income tax and the Franchise and Excise Tax on factories. It will raise the gas 6 cents or if you have a 15 gallon tank – or .90 cents a fill up. If you don’t drive a gas vehicle, it will raise the a (sic) diesel tax and impose a $100 annual registration fee for an electric vehicle.”

So as long as gas prices do not increase and you spend 3:1 food vs. fuel, then it is “pocket book neutral” as long as “most people” maintain this ratio of course. I think “most” still means more than 50% even in Common Core Mathspeak.  Of course, if you are buying diesel and need 15 gallons, it will cost an additional $0.12/gallon or $1.80. Oops, there went that pocketbook thingy. I guess I need to buy another $90 in groceries so I can “save” $0.90 to keep your fuel tax increase “neutral”?

But who cares about diesel anyway? What? Oh. The truck drivers. You mean the ones that deliver just about everything you buy at the mega-lo-mart, corporate welfare queens Amazon and FedEx……and the grocery? Yeah, those diesel trucks. Gee, I wonder what that 71% increase in the diesel fuel tax will do to that $100 grocery bill you used to have? Hint: they generally have larger than 15-gallon fuel tanks and lower fuel mileage than your personal car. What will the additional 33% increase in the gasoline tax mean for your grocery budget? I am wondering if the “leadership” Republicans are really this short-sighted or if they are only counting on you being easily fooled?

Conveniently left out of the discussion are the huge cuts to the Hall Income Tax ($102.1M) and cuts to Franchise Taxes ($122.3M), which when combined with the forecast reduction in sales tax on food give a total cut of $279.2M. In other words, the proposed $1 savings on your groceries sales tax only amounts to 19.6% of the “cuts” that we have to pass massive fuel tax increases to make “revenue neutral”.

Then we move on to use of the term “user fees” instead of that bad word “taxes” and explain that “user fees” should be paid by those using the roads, but then despite her photo at the top of the newsletter with “No Socialism” prominently displayed, we are taught that Some Socialism is acceptable when it comes to taxes (or they are not good Republican principles – kind of hard to tell which):

“Why lower some taxes while raising other taxes? Government uses fund accounting. Some taxes go into the General Fund and other taxes go into the Highway Fund. The taxes in the Highway Fund are all user fees – so if you drive – you pay for the roads, and you pay for them in proportion to how much you use them.

Paying for government by use of user fees is a good Republican principle. Much of government is not user fees but subsidized through the General Fund taxes because some things cannot be paid for by use of user fees. For instance, K – 12 education – most families could never pay all of what it costs to educate their children. TennCare too is a subsidy to the recipient – because the poor cannot pay for their care. Higher education is part user fee and part subsidized – students pay tuition (user fee) but they pay less than half of what their education actually costs – the tax payers through the General Fund subsidize the rest, and they also subsidize the buildings and maintenance for the buildings.”

Wow, for a second there, I thought a sacred cow was getting slaughtered. No, I guess not everyone can afford $10,000 each for their 1.8 kids to go to “free” government school when the average household income is less than $50k and 25% or more of us qualify for food stamps. But maybe we could figure out how multiple private schools provide an education for 40% less, rather than  using the super-inflated “free” schools’ price to justify another tax increase. Here’s a little food for thought. Let’s say the “free” schools could cut only half the difference in price to a mere $8000/student/year : $2000 * 1,000,000 public school students = $2,000,000,000 EVERY YEAR.

And the higher education language…students pay less than half of what education costs. Gee, after 13 YEARS (plus any pre-K) of “free” education why should they start paying for it at all? This is more divide-the-people obfuscation since of course everyone paying for tuition (or not) is a taxpayer paying for higher education (and their 20% inflation rates). Even when the students graduate, they pay taxes the rest of their lives in Tennessee. Now that community college is “free”, just wait to see how much it costs!

“So the Governor hopes to lower several taxes in the General Fund thus eliminating the surplus and effectively shifting the surplus to the Highway Fund by raising the user fee taxes. The plan is for all of this reduction and shifting to be as revenue neutral as possible to as many tax payers as possible.

Truly, every person and family will have their own calculous (sic). So please, take out a pencil and paper and do your own math.”

After justifying this massive fuel tax increase with people buying $100 in groceries and not being able to afford public school costs, the lion’s share of the tax breaks are the Hall Income Tax and Franchise Tax folk. Is that really helping “most people” or “as many tax payers as possible”? Because the rest of you dupes will be paying more for your fuel AND more for the same groceries, which means….your grocery sales tax cut is ALSO REVENUE NEUTRAL.

STOP WITH THE LIES ALREADY! IT’S A TAX INCREASE ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT!

Weekly Report from TN Co. Commissioners Association April 7, 2017

Members,

I’m attaching 3 reports and the explanations are listed below. This week the legislative process peaked out and has started to slow down.

Report “A” shows 11 bills in C&R that have not been put on notice, 70 bills on the move next week and 1 Senate bill scheduled for C&R 4/20/17.

Report “B” shows 46 bills have passed, 10 bills have failed and 8 bills have been withdrawn.

Report “C” shows 52 Senate bills have been placed in General Sub, 28 House bills have been take off notice, 5 bills have been deferred until next year, 7 House bills have been placed behind the budget, 3 House bills are waiting for a special committee, 4 bills have been recommended for summer study and 1 house bill has been set for the last calendar for Finance sub..

The bills that are in General Sub could be put on notice any day and the House bills that are off notice can be put on notice any day except the bills assigned to committees that have been shut down.

Thanks and have a great weekend,

Charlie

4-7-17 Report A

4-7-17 Report B

4-7-17 Report C

Jail RFQ Evaluation Team/Screening Committee meeting Thursday at 8:30 AM

The jail evaluations will meet in the commission room on February 23rd at 8:30 AM to interview the 3 architectural firms that were chosen based on scoring of written qualifications.  These written qualifications and scores are currently secret due to a change in Tennessee purchasing law last year.  The public will still not be able to comment on the firms.  Purchasing Agent Katie Branham wrote of the interviews, “They are open to the public for observation only.”

Jail RFQ Evaluation Team members revealed?

The local government purchasing procedures evaluating specialty/professional services was a reasonably open process until a change to state law last year which allows all local governments to close evaluation processes.  The law was a huge mistake and it should be immediately repealed.

Some of the comments that I have received related to the members of the jail Request for Qualifications (RFQ) Evaluation Team/Screening Committee members being secret include:

  • I feel like I am living in a communist country.
  • I can’t believe that they think the electorate shouldn’t be able to talk to the team members.
  • I can’t see any good in this law.

The week before last an article in the paper confirmed that a “citizen” is indeed serving as an evaluator.  I wrote about the delay due to a search for a citizen here.  This appears to deviate from the RFQ that was issued.  Page 16 says that the Screening Committee will consist of members of the county legislative body and Sheriff’s Office.

“The proposals will then be given to a Screening Committee consisting of members of the county legislative body and Sheriff’s Office. This committee will evaluate the proposals and determine the top proposals.”

The theory behind the new secret government law is that keeping the evaluators insulated through secrecy protects the integrity of the process by preventing undue influence.  However, this process surrounding the jail never had any integrity to begin with.  Furthermore, if the evaluators are so weak as to be influenced by some comments from the public and architectural firms then better, stronger people need to be selected.  Weak choices don’t justify secret government.  Purchasing Departments aren’t the CIA.

The Tennessee Senate sponsor of this new law, Senator Ken Yager, has chosen to block me on Twitter rather than return my phone calls and listen to the reasons why the law should be repealed.  Yager refuses to even have a discussion on the matter.  Thus, in protest of the law and to provide transparency to a secret process, I am releasing what I believe to be the names of the Evaluation Team.

It is possible that these aren’t the evaluators and that I was given bad information.  If not, some much needed sunshine is now being added to a issue that has been far too secretive.

Without further ado, the names provided to me are:

Blount County Commission Mike Caylor
Blount County Deputy Chief Chris Cantrell
Blount County Director of General Services Don Stallions
Blount County Purchasing Technician Lori Bell
Blount County Citizen C. Sterling

For those that are fairly new to the issue, please take the time to become informed.  Read the articles provided below.

On the manufactured overcrowding crisis and keeping state felons
Are counties required to keep felons sentenced to more than a year?
Commissioner Tona Monroe calls for immediate meeting of Blount County Corrections Partnership to discuss removing discretionary inmates after AG’s opinion on state sentenced felons.
Tennessee AG opinion 16-21

Sheriff signed a contract to house federal inmates without commission approval
Tennessee Comptroller’s Office says it can find no specific statutory authority for a sheriff to sign a contract to house federal inmates without commission approval

$2 million jail/public safety assignments never approved by the commission
Comptroller’s Office says it doesn’t recognize assignments totaling $2 million in funds for jail
Audit report says Blount County Commission has the authority to assign General Fund

Tennessee Corrections Institute can’t shut the jail down
http://www.bcpublicrecord.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/TCIAuthorityLetter.pdf

TCI employee bullies public and pushes counties into building
Bob Bass of TCI tells press and citizens to turn cameras off: Shows them video already on YouTube
March 2016 Commission Report

A 30 year emergency that the legislature fails to address?
Tennessee General Assembly often nonresponsive to needed and responsible reforms

Fire Marshall on inmate classification
Types of inmates don’t influence State Fire Marshal’s decision to shut jail down

Cost to house federal inmates
Purchasing Agent & Director of General Services chose $65K consultant over $18.5K option
Sheriff’s Office doesn’t have form used to determine inmate costs

Can we believe anything that is said?
Sheriff Berrong said he doesn’t want to keep state prisoners and they’re only a good deal for the state
Is someone not telling the truth?

Does lawful authority mean anything?
Purchasing Agent explains her duties when it suits the machine
Comptroller’s Office says it doesn’t recognize assignments totaling $2 million in funds for jail
Tennessee Comptroller’s Office says it can find no specific statutory authority for a sheriff to sign a contract to house federal inmates without commission approval

No answers?
Why were federal inmates removed from the Blount County jail?

Observations and suggestions ignored?
Former Sheriff’s Chief Clerk wrote letter to the Mayor on jail overcrowding

Media bias?
The series of articles has begun

Conflicts of interest on the Blount County Corrections Partnership
March 2016 Commission Report

Making money keeping inmates?
Sheriff Berrong said he doesn’t want to keep state prisoners and they’re only a good deal for the state
Sheriff’s Office doesn’t have form used to determine inmate costs

Blount County debt and liabilities
$228,646,423 in total liabilities according to the 2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (page 24)

Secret purchasing procedures
Interview on new purchasing RFQ/RFP exemption to Tennessee Open Records Act
Two wrongs don’t make a right: State RFP purchasing process shouldn’t be secret either
New secret purchasing law

Urge the Tennessee General Assembly to repeal the secret purchasing laws governing state and local purchasing procedures.

“Ken Yager” <sen.ken.yager@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.paul.bailey@capitol.tn.gov, “Mae Beavers” <sen.mae.beavers@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.mike.bell@capitol.tn.gov, “Janice Bowling” <sen.janice.bowling@capitol.tn.gov>, “Richard Briggs” <sen.richard.briggs@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.rusty.crowe@capitol.tn.gov, “Steven Dickerson” <sen.steven.dickerson@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.todd.gardenshire@capitol.tn.gov, “Mark Green” <sen.mark.green@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.dolores.gresham@capitol.tn.gov, sen.ferrell.haile@capitol.tn.gov, sen.thelma.harper@capitol.tn.gov, sen.lee.harris@capitol.tn.gov, sen.joey.hensley@capitol.tn.gov, “Ed Jackson” <sen.ed.jackson@capitol.tn.gov>,  “Jack Johnson” <sen.jack.johnson@capitol.tn.gov>, “Brian Kelsey” <sen.brian.kelsey@capitol.tn.gov>, “Bill Ketron” <sen.bill.ketron@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.sara.kyle@capitol.tn.gov, sen.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov, “Becky Massey” <sen.becky.massey@capitol.tn.gov>,
lt.gov.randy.mcnally@capitol.tn.gov, sen.frank.niceley@capitol.tn.gov, “Mark Norris” <sen.mark.norris@capitol.tn.gov>, “Doug Overbey” <sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.kerry.roberts@capitol.tn.gov, “Steve Southerland” <sen.steve.southerland@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.john.stevens@capitol.tn.gov, sen.reginald.tate@capitol.tn.gov, sen.jim.tracy@capitol.tn.gov, sen.bo.watson@capitol.tn.gov, sen.jeff.yarbro@capitol.tn.gov

rep.raumesh.akbari@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.alexander@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.beck@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harry.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sheila.butt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.byrd@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kent.calfee@capitol.tn.gov, rep.karen.camper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dale.carr@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.carter@capitol.tn.gov, rep.glen.casada@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ray.clemmons@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jim.coley@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barbara.cooper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.crawford@capitol.tn.gov,
rep.michael.curcio@capitol.tn.gov, rep.martin.daniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.deberry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barry.doss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.dunn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.eldridge@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jeremy.faison@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andrew.farmer@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joanne.favors@capitol.tn.gov, rep.craig.fitzhugh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.forgety@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.gant@capitol.tn.gov, rep.brenda.gilmore@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tilman.goins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.marc.gravitt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.halford@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ga.hardaway@capitol.tn.gov, speaker.beth.harwell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.hawk@capitol.tn.gov, rep.patsy.hazlewood@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gary.hicks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.timothy.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.matthew.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.holsclaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andy.holt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dan.howell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bud.hulsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.darren.jernigan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.johnson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sherry.jones@capitol.tn.gov, rep.roger.kane@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kelly.keisling@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sabi.kumar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.william.lamberth@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mary.littleton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.lollar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harold.love@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov, rep.susan.lynn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.pat.marsh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.judd.matheny@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.matlock@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gerald.mccormick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcdaniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.larry.miller@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bo.mitchell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.debra.moody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.antonio.parkinson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.pitts@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.pody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.powell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dennis.powers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ragan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bob.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jay.reedy@capitol.tn.gov, rep.courtney.rogers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.sanderson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.charles.sargent@capitol.tn.gov, rep.cameron.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jerry.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnny.shaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.eddie.smith@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.sparks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.rick.staples@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.stewart@capitol.tn.gov, rep.art.swann@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bryan.terry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.towns@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.travis@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnnie.turner@capitol.tn.gov, rep.micah.vanhuss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.terri.lynn.weaver@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dawn.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sam.whitson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ryan.williams@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.windle@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tim.wirgau@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.zachary@capitol.tn.gov, tracey.vance@capitol.tn.gov,

Haslam (R) Pushes to Raise Taxes Despite Billion Dollar Surplus

From Rocky Top Politics:

“After over-collecting $2 billion dollars from Tennessee taxpayers, Gov. Bill Haslam today said he thinks Tennesseans are not taxed enough and wants to raise the taxes on that most basic of middle class commodities:  gasoline.

Reports indicate Haslam is trying to sugarcoat the tax increase by promising to “index” the taxes (meaning they can go up without additional legislative approval) and to cut a little from the food and/or sales tax rate.

Sure.

What is astonishing is that this proposal comes on the eve of the inauguration of Donald Trump as the next President…Trump was elected by middle class outrage over politicians who do dumb things like, well, raise taxes when you are sitting on a $2 billion surplus.”

Two wrongs don’t make a right: State RFP purchasing process shouldn’t be secret either

One of the points that some will make in defending the recent change to the open records law, exempting qualifications and proposals while they’re being evaluated by a secret screening committee, is that the state has been operating that way.  Two wrongs don’t make a right.

Here is a good example of a controversial issue that has been shrouded in secrecy.  The state should open its purchasing procedures to the public.  The fact that the state has been operating in secret is not a good reason to justify allowing local government purchasing procedures to operate in secret.

The Yager/Calfee exemption law should be repealed.  The law allowing secret state purchasing procedures should also be repealed.

Contact Senator Ken Yager sen.ken.yager@capitol.tn.gov and Representative Kent Calfee rep.kent.calfee@capitol.tn.gov to repeal the secret purchasing practices.

 

Interview on new purchasing RFQ/RFP exemption to Tennessee Open Records Act

In response to the stonewalling related to my (Tona Monroe) request for information and records related to the Screening Committee/Evaluation Team for the request for qualifications related to jail expansion, David Tulis interviewed me and Deborah Fischer today about a new exemption to the Open Records Act.  I learned that what was previously public information is now sealed until there is an intent to award a contract.

There is a point in the interview when I said proposal where I should have said qualifications.  Also, the person who shared concerns about purchasing policies said that the policies “may” not comply with law. He did not state definitely that didn’t comply with law.

David Tulis interviewed Blount County Commissioner Tona Monroe

 

David Tulis interviewed Deborah Fisher of the Tennessee Coalition of Open Government
https://www.facebook.com/hotnews1240/videos/1211086112291916/

Tennessee General Assembly often nonresponsive to needed and responsible reforms

In my quest for better government, I have written the members of the Tennessee General Assembly on several issues that are ripe for reform.  The legislators have been largely unresponsive.

One such matter is the salaries of government officials and employees.  Tennessee judges enjoy being the best paid judges in the nation, after a cost of living adjustment.  Many elected officials make 2, 3 and 4 times what the average taxpayer makes.  The salaries of some UT officials are outrageous.

Only 2 state legislators have responded to my request for salary reform: Representative Roger Kane and Senator Richard Briggs.  Both have realized that the salaries are excessive but neither has been willing to take the lead to reform how government officials are compensated.  Representative Susan Lynn responded to a friend who sent an email on the matter.  Lynn said she struggled with the salaries but justified them as being necessary to attract good people.

Another matter that I have written about is the supposed 30 year emergency that the Tennessee Department of Corrections (TDOC) is operating under.  State sentenced felons are clogging local jails throughout the state and the legislature has done little to address it.  As such, several local governments have gone deeply in debt to deal with the crisis that the state won’t fix.

Tennessee has the financial resources.  It had a roughly $1 billion surplus in extra tax money that could have been used to fix criminal justice problems and crumbling roads.  Instead it went to teachers salaries and an expensive museum, among other things.  Part of the surplus did go to roads but the legislature did not even fully restore what was taken from transportation funding in the previous decade.

Not one state legislator responded when I sent an email to them with a link to the news article where TDOC says that it has been operating under an emergency declaration since 1985.  How can an emergency exist for 30 years?  This is reprehensible.

When I hear a state legislator brag about Tennessee being one of the lowest indebted nation in the state I cringe.  When do these legislators talk about the debt burden of local governments resulting from state inactions?  The state looks good because it can dump its problems on the back of local governments as it is doing with state sentenced prisoners.

Furthermore, state legislators brag about cutting taxes at the state level.  That sounds good but what about the impact on local tax rates from salary mandates and housing state sentenced felons?

These legislators should be thoroughly rebuked for allowing the problem to burden local governments with debt to pay for housing state inmates.  The Tennessee General Assembly needs to be more responsive to the problems within local government and society, particularly the criminal justice system.  Ignoring criminal justice problems and salary mandates means that local taxpayers will continue to pay for the inactions of the state legislature.

Tennessee General Assembly Emails:

sen.paul.bailey@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.mike.bell@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.rusty.crowe@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.todd.gardenshire@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.dolores.gresham@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.ferrell.haile@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.thelma.harper@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.lee.harris@captitol.tn.gov,
sen.joey.hensley@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.randy.mcnally@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.kerry.roberts@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.john.stevens@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.reginald.tate@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jim.tracy@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.bo.watson@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jeff.yarbro@capitol.tn.gov,
“Becky Massey” <sen.becky.massey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Bill Ketron” <sen.bill.ketron@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Brian Kelsey” <sen.brian.kelsey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Doug Overbey” <sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Ed Jackson” <sen.ed.jackson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Frank Niceley” <sen.frank.niceley@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Jack Johnson” <sen.jack.johnson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Janice Bowling” <sen.janice.bowling@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mae Beavers” <sen.mae.beavers@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mark Green” <sen.mark.green@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mark Norris” <sen.mark.norris@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Steven Dickerson” <sen.steven.dickerson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Steve Southerland” <sen.steve.southerland@capitol.tn.gov>,
sen.sara.kyle@capitol.tn.gov,
“Richard Briggs” <sen.richard.briggs@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Ken Yager” <sen.ken.yager@capitol.tn.gov>,
rep.raumesh.akbari@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.alexander@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.armstrong@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.beck@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harry.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sheila.butt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.byrd@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kent.calfee@capitol.tn.gov, rep.karen.camper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dale.carr@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.carter@capitol.tn.gov, rep.glen.casada@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ray.clemmons@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jim.coley@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barbara.cooper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.martin.daniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.deberry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barry.doss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.dunlap@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.dunn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.eldridge@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jeremy.faison@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andrew.farmer@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joanne.favors@capitol.tn.gov, rep.craig.fitzhugh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.forgety@capitol.tn.gov, rep.brenda.gilmore@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tilman.goins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.marc.gravitt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.halford@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ga.hardaway@capitol.tn.gov, speaker.beth.harwell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.hawk@capitol.tn.gov, rep.patsy.hazlewood@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gary.hicks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.timothy.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.matthew.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.holsclaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andy.holt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dan.howell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bud.hulsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jamie.jenkins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.darren.jernigan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.johnson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sherry.jones@capitol.tn.gov, rep.roger.kane@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kelly.keisling@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sabi.kumar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.william.lamberth@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mary.littleton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.lollar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harold.love@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov, rep.susan.lynn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.pat.marsh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.judd.matheny@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.matlock@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gerald.mccormick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcdaniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcmanus@capitol.tn.gov, rep.larry.miller@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bo.mitchell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.debra.moody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.antonio.parkinson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.pitts@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.pody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.powell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dennis.powers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ragan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bob.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jay.reedy@capitol.tn.gov, rep.courtney.rogers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.sanderson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.charles.sargent@capitol.tn.gov, rep.cameron.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jerry.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnny.shaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.shepard@capitol.tn.gov, rep.eddie.smith@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.sparks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.billy.spivey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.stewart@capitol.tn.gov, rep.art.swann@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bryan.terry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.towns@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.travis@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnnie.turner@capitol.tn.gov, rep.micah.vanhuss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.terri.lynn.weaver@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dawn.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ryan.williams@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.windle@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tim.wirgau@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.zachary@capitol.tn.gov

Also see 2003 Comptroller’s report (pages 10-11) referencing the state operating under an emergency statute since the 1980s.  SHAMEFUL!!!

Senator Doug Overbey and Representative Art Swann are nonresponsive

Some years back, prior to be elected to serve as a county commissioner, I (Tona Monroe) asked Senator Doug Overbey to obtain an opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General.  He declined saying that that he felt that AG’s opinions should be used to answer questions that local government officials have.  His response told me that he doesn’t give a flip what the people he is elected to serve want but I had hoped that after my election to local government that Overbey would be responsive to my requests for information and ideas for reform.  He isn’t.

I can’t recall him responding to anything that I have sent him since taking office in September 2014.  He did find the time to send me a letter during his campaign for reelection saying he hoped that he had earned my support.

Overbey spends his time catering to his wealthy donors and attending social events.  He represents the elite.  He is a career politician floating in the swamp of Nashville.

The people of Tennessee failed to drain the swap in Nashville during the primary elections in August.  Voter turnout was very low.  The election was lost in the drama and media coverage of federal politics.  I encourage everyone to pay more attention to state and local politics.

Representative Art Swann doesn’t respond either.  Rep. Bob Ramsey does respond to some things but never offers to work toward any reform that will improve local government.

Senator Doug Overbey: sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov  850-9411
Representative Bob Ramsey: rep.bob.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov  984-8124
Representative Art Swann: rep.art.swann@capitol.tn.gov  982-6811

This Thanksgiving she’ll be thankful that she will make more than 10 times Tennessee households

This is so disgusting.  It’s salaries like this that make government elite so out of touch with the working folks.  http://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/education/2016/11/21/university-tennessee-name-davenport-next-chancellor/94233352/

Seriously? $585K?  Why stop there?  Why not make it $10 million?  The state legislature can just tax the people more to pay for anything the elite want.  Never mind what they make.

The median household income in Tennessee is was $47,275 in 2015.  That’s an entire household, not one salary.  http://www.deptofnumbers.com/income/tennessee/

Tennessee General Assembly Emails:

sen.paul.bailey@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.mike.bell@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.rusty.crowe@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.todd.gardenshire@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.dolores.gresham@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.ferrell.haile@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.thelma.harper@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.lee.harris@captitol.tn.gov,
sen.joey.hensley@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.randy.mcnally@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.kerry.roberts@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.john.stevens@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.reginald.tate@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jim.tracy@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.bo.watson@capitol.tn.gov,
sen.jeff.yarbro@capitol.tn.gov,
“Becky Massey” <sen.becky.massey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Bill Ketron” <sen.bill.ketron@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Brian Kelsey” <sen.brian.kelsey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Doug Overbey” <sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Ed Jackson” <sen.ed.jackson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Frank Niceley” <sen.frank.niceley@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Jack Johnson” <sen.jack.johnson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Janice Bowling” <sen.janice.bowling@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mae Beavers” <sen.mae.beavers@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mark Green” <sen.mark.green@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Mark Norris” <sen.mark.norris@capitol.tn.gov>,
lt.gov.ron.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov,
“Steven Dickerson” <sen.steven.dickerson@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Steve Southerland” <sen.steve.southerland@capitol.tn.gov>,
sen.sara.kyle@capitol.tn.gov,
“Richard Briggs” <sen.richard.briggs@capitol.tn.gov>,
“Ken Yager” <sen.ken.yager@capitol.tn.gov>,
rep.raumesh.akbari@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.alexander@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.armstrong@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.beck@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harry.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sheila.butt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.byrd@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kent.calfee@capitol.tn.gov, rep.karen.camper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dale.carr@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.carter@capitol.tn.gov, rep.glen.casada@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ray.clemmons@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jim.coley@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barbara.cooper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.martin.daniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.deberry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barry.doss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.dunlap@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.dunn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.eldridge@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jeremy.faison@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andrew.farmer@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joanne.favors@capitol.tn.gov, rep.craig.fitzhugh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.forgety@capitol.tn.gov, rep.brenda.gilmore@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tilman.goins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.marc.gravitt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.halford@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ga.hardaway@capitol.tn.gov, speaker.beth.harwell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.hawk@capitol.tn.gov, rep.patsy.hazlewood@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gary.hicks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.timothy.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.matthew.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.holsclaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andy.holt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dan.howell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bud.hulsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jamie.jenkins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.darren.jernigan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.johnson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sherry.jones@capitol.tn.gov, rep.roger.kane@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kelly.keisling@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sabi.kumar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.william.lamberth@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mary.littleton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.lollar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harold.love@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov, rep.susan.lynn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.pat.marsh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.judd.matheny@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.matlock@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gerald.mccormick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcdaniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcmanus@capitol.tn.gov, rep.larry.miller@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bo.mitchell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.debra.moody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.antonio.parkinson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.pitts@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.pody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.powell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dennis.powers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ragan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bob.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jay.reedy@capitol.tn.gov, rep.courtney.rogers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.sanderson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.charles.sargent@capitol.tn.gov, rep.cameron.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jerry.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnny.shaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.shepard@capitol.tn.gov, rep.eddie.smith@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.sparks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.billy.spivey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.stewart@capitol.tn.gov, rep.art.swann@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bryan.terry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.towns@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.travis@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnnie.turner@capitol.tn.gov, rep.micah.vanhuss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.terri.lynn.weaver@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dawn.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ryan.williams@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.windle@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tim.wirgau@capitol.tn.gov, rep.rick.womick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.zachary@capitol.tn.gov

10th amendment goes out the window when federal money is on the line

Tennessee could lose federal funding because it doesn’t have a law on the books that complies with a federal rule concerning the blood alcohol level of those between 18 and 20.

http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2016/08/26/tennessee-attorney-general-joins-fight-save-road-funds/89421304/

Tennessee trial court judges are best paid in nation after cost of living adjustment

I’ve long maintained that government officials in Tennessee are making too much money and that the salaries are far too disproportionate to the salaries of the people paying their salaries.  During the past two budget discussions, I tried unsuccessfully to cut some of the top paid county officials salaries to the state mandated minimums.

A new survey shows that trial judges in Tennessee are the best paid in the nation after a cost of living adjustment.

Judicial salaries and rank among the states and Washington DC
High Court (Supreme Court) $182,508  12th
Intermediate Appellate Court $176,436  9th
General-Jurisdiction Court $170,352  9th  after cost of living adjustment 1st

Compare that to the taxpaying citizens for Tennessee.  Tennessee ranked 46th in 2014 for median household income at $43,716.

You can express your concerns to the Tennessee Generally Assembly.

sen.ken.yager@capitol.tn.gov, “Becky Massey” <sen.becky.massey@capitol.tn.gov>, “Bill Ketron” <sen.bill.ketron@capitol.tn.gov>, “Brian Kelsey” <sen.brian.kelsey@capitol.tn.gov>, “Doug Overbey” <sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov>, “Ed Jackson” <sen.ed.jackson@capitol.tn.gov>, “Frank Niceley” <sen.frank.niceley@capitol.tn.gov>, “Jack Johnson” <sen.jack.johnson@capitol.tn.gov>, “Janice Bowling” <sen.janice.bowling@capitol.tn.gov>, “Mae Beavers” <sen.mae.beavers@capitol.tn.gov>, “Mark Green” <sen.mark.green@capitol.tn.gov>, “Mark Norris” <sen.mark.norris@capitol.tn.gov>, lt.gov.ron.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov, “Steven Dickerson” <sen.steven.dickerson@capitol.tn.gov>, “Steve Southerland” <sen.steve.southerland@capitol.tn.gov>, sen.sara.kyle@capitol.tn.gov, “Richard Briggs” <sen.richard.briggs@capitol.tn.gov>, rep.raumesh.akbari@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.alexander@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.armstrong@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.beck@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harry.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.brooks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sheila.butt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.byrd@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kent.calfee@capitol.tn.gov, rep.karen.camper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dale.carr@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.carter@capitol.tn.gov, rep.glen.casada@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ray.clemmons@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jim.coley@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barbara.cooper@capitol.tn.gov, rep.martin.daniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.deberry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.barry.doss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kevin.dunlap@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.dunn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.eldridge@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jeremy.faison@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andrew.farmer@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joanne.favors@capitol.tn.gov, rep.craig.fitzhugh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.forgety@capitol.tn.gov, rep.brenda.gilmore@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tilman.goins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.marc.gravitt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.halford@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ga.hardaway@capitol.tn.gov, speaker.beth.harwell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.hawk@capitol.tn.gov, rep.patsy.hazlewood@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gary.hicks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.timothy.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.matthew.hill@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.holsclaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.andy.holt@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dan.howell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bud.hulsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jamie.jenkins@capitol.tn.gov, rep.darren.jernigan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.curtis.johnson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sherry.jones@capitol.tn.gov, rep.roger.kane@capitol.tn.gov, rep.kelly.keisling@capitol.tn.gov, rep.sabi.kumar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.william.lamberth@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mary.littleton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.lollar@capitol.tn.gov, rep.harold.love@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jon.lundberg@capitol.tn.gov, rep.susan.lynn@capitol.tn.gov, rep.pat.marsh@capitol.tn.gov, rep.judd.matheny@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jimmy.matlock@capitol.tn.gov, rep.gerald.mccormick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcdaniel@capitol.tn.gov, rep.steve.mcmanus@capitol.tn.gov, rep.larry.miller@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bo.mitchell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.debra.moody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.antonio.parkinson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.pitts@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.pody@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.powell@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dennis.powers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.ragan@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bob.ramsey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jay.reedy@capitol.tn.gov, rep.courtney.rogers@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bill.sanderson@capitol.tn.gov, rep.charles.sargent@capitol.tn.gov, rep.cameron.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jerry.sexton@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnny.shaw@capitol.tn.gov, rep.david.shepard@capitol.tn.gov, rep.eddie.smith@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.sparks@capitol.tn.gov, rep.billy.spivey@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mike.stewart@capitol.tn.gov, rep.art.swann@capitol.tn.gov, rep.bryan.terry@capitol.tn.gov, rep.joe.towns@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ron.travis@capitol.tn.gov, rep.johnnie.turner@capitol.tn.gov, rep.micah.vanhuss@capitol.tn.gov, rep.terri.lynn.weaver@capitol.tn.gov, rep.dawn.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.mark.white@capitol.tn.gov, rep.ryan.williams@capitol.tn.gov, rep.john.windle@capitol.tn.gov, rep.tim.wirgau@capitol.tn.gov, rep.rick.womick@capitol.tn.gov, rep.jason.zachary@capitol.tn.gov,

When Uncle Sugar isn’t your pimp

outhouse

photo: Horatio Bunce

by Horatio Bunce

In my neck of the woods, a “food desert” somewhere in FEMA Region IV, a local business thumbs their nose at the “cell-phone-and-a-pen” unconstitutional platitudes emanating from Washington DC. Folks like us not receiving the corporate welfare benefits that result in forced acceptance of Bill Gates’ Common Core, Pearson Sharia Social Studies, PARCC/SBAC/AIR/UTAH SAGE test question rentals and now apparently co-ed public school locker rooms, are finding it hard to understand why the super-majority Republicans in Tennessee shake in their boots every time Hedy Weinberg utters a threat to federal funding. We “might” get sued. Uncle Sugar “might” withhold your money that was automatically “withheld” from you when you earned it to begin with.  So keep turning those tricks Welfare Queen. You don’t want to get slapped by Uncle Sugar, do you?

All those liberties sold out chasing Uncle Sugar’s dollar (which was yours to begin with). They sure came cheap. You can call it “state-led” all you want, but it is plain to see who is in control.

The rich ruleth over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender.  Proverbs 22:7

 

Are counties required to keep felons sentenced to more than a year?

We’ve been told that the county is required to keep state sentenced inmates until the Department of Corrections takes them.  However, after reading state law, I wonder if that is incorrect for felons who have been sentenced to more than a year.  See 41-8-106 (a) and (g) (1) below.

According to the inmate numbers provided by Jail Administrator Captain John Adams, the Blount County Adult Detention Facility averaged 174 TDOC (state) sentenced felons with a year or more remaining on their sentence.  If you couple that with the federal inmates, which are discretionary, the jail would not be overcrowded, according to recent inmate totals.

On March 31st, The Daily Times reported that the total number of inmates in the local jail on March 30th was 517 including 76 federal inmates and 142 Tennessee Department of Corrections inmates sentenced and awaiting transfer to a state facility.  If the federal and state inmates were removed from the jail, the inmate total would have been 299, which is well below the certified capacity of 350 beds and below the 90% rate that some consider the optimal standard of 315 beds filled.

Are we required to keep these state felons with a sentence of more than a year?  Read below and see what you think.

From a May 27th email:

“Commissioner Monroe,  In the last year (May 28,2015 to May 27, 2016) our State sentenced inmates break down in the following way:

TDOC – Convicted felons awaiting space in the prison system with at least 1 year left to serve.

Average Daily Count – 174        Highest Daily Count – 193         Lowest Daily Count – 122

TDOC (Local) – Convicted inmates with less than 1 year to serve. May be felon or misdemeanor. These inmates serve their time here.

Average Daily Count – 85          Highest Daily Count – 104         Lowest Daily Count – 40   

I hope this helps.    Capt. Adams”

—–Original Message—–
From: “Randy Vineyard” <rvineyard@blounttn.org>
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2016 2:19pm
To: tona@breezeair.net
Cc: “Jeff French” <jfrench@bcso.com>, “Jimbo Berrong” <jberrong@bcso.com>, “Ed Mitchell” <emitchell@blounttn.org>
Subject: RE: 46915 CONTRACTED PRISONER BOARD

Commissioner,

Blount County has no contract with the State on inmates. The State pays us $37/day/inmate as is the case with most counties.

There may be different arrangements between the State and privately managed detention facilities.

If you have further questions about this matter those may be better addressed by the BCSO.

Thanks

Randy

Randy Vineyard, IOM

Blount County Finance Director

341 Court Street

Maryville, TN 37804

865-273-5719 (office)

rvineyard@blounttn.org

The information in this email and any attachment is confidential and may be legally privileged.  If you are not the intended recipient, please destroy this message, delete any copies held on your system, and notify the sender immediately.  You should not retain, copy, or use this email for any purpose, nor disclose all or any part of its content to any other person.

From: tona@breezeair.net
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2016 2:00 AM
To: Randy Vineyard
Subject: 46915 CONTRACTED PRISONER BOARD

Dear Finance Director Vineyard,

The line item for revenue for state inmates/prisoners is 46915.  It is identified as “contracted prisoner board”.  Does Blount County have a contract with the state for housing inmates/prisoners?  Or does the county receive a daily per diem instead?

Thanks,

Tona

41-8-106.  Housing state prisoners — Contracting — Reimbursement of costs — Debt service. 

(a) No county shall be required to house convicted felons sentenced to more than one (1) year of continuous confinement unless the county, through the authority of its county legislative body, has chosen to contract with the department of correction for the purpose of housing certain felons. The department shall promulgate rules for requirements and procedures for contracting.

(b) Counties may contract, in writing, with the state or with other counties for responsibility of correctional populations.

(c)  (1) Counties shall be reimbursed for housing convicted felons pursuant to the general appropriations act and according to rules and regulations for determining reasonable allowable costs as promulgated by the department, in consultation with the comptroller of the treasury. The department is authorized to include capital costs within the meaning of reasonable allowable costs. Capital costs may include, but are not limited to, debt service.

   (2) The commissioner is authorized, without promulgation of rules and regulations, to agree to reimburse a county for debt service on debt issued by the county in constructing correctional facilities for the purpose of housing inmates sentenced to the county under the authority of a contract entered into under subsection (a). In addition to principal, interest and redemption premiums, debt service may include other necessary items or costs reasonably related to the issuance of such county debt. Upon entering an agreement, the department is authorized to reimburse the county for one hundred percent (100%) of debt service, regardless of whether the county is actually housing inmates under a contract, and until a contract is terminated. The commissioner may not, following execution of any such agreement, amend existing rules and regulations or promulgate new rules and regulations that will impair the state’s obligation to reimburse debt service as provided in an agreement. Any obligation for the reimbursement of debt service shall be a contractual obligation of the state.

(d) It is the intent of the state that the holders of debt issued by a county for which the department has agreed to reimburse debt service pursuant to an agreement under this section may rely on, and benefit from, this section and of any obligation by the department and the state to reimburse the county for debt service contained in any agreement, and the state pledges to and agrees with any holders that the state will not amend this section, or limit or alter the obligation of the department and the state to reimburse debt service under any agreement, in any way that would impair the rights and remedies of any holders, or of the county, with respect to reimbursement. This subsection (d) shall not affect the right of the commissioner to terminate any agreement entered into under this section pursuant to the terms set forth in any agreements.

(e) The subsidies paid to counties pursuant to this chapter shall be the only compensation from the state to which counties are entitled for housing state prisoners and shall be in lieu of the fees allowed in § 8-26-106 or any other section.

(f) The department is further authorized to provide additional subsidies to counties for the purpose of community and other diversion programs for pretrial detainees, misdemeanants or convicted felons subject to available appropriations and in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the department.

(g)  (1) The department shall take into its custody all convicted felons from any county that had not contracted with the state as authorized by subsection (b). The department shall not be required to take actual physical custody of any of the felons until fourteen (14) days after the department has received all certified sentencing documents from the clerk of the sentencing court.

   (2) The commissioner is authorized to compensate any county that has not contracted with the state as authorized by subsection (b) for that county’s reasonable, allowable cost of housing felons. The rate of compensation to these counties shall be determined by and is subject to the level of funding authorized in the appropriations bill; however, the commissioner shall not compensate any county that fails or refuses to promptly transfer actual physical custody of an inmate to the department after being requested by the department, in writing, to do so for each day or portion of a day that the county fails to transfer the inmate. The written notice shall include the date it intends to take custody of the inmate for transfer to the department. The notice shall be given as soon as practicable before the transfer date. By June 15, 2005, the department shall notify each sheriff of the provisions of this subdivision (g)(2) and the consequences for failing to comply with it.

(h) In the event that a county has been reimbursed pursuant to this section for housing convicted felons for a continuous period of three (3) or more fiscal years and has received the maximum amount allowed per prisoner per day as reasonable allowable costs during this period, then the county shall thereafter be presumed to be entitled to the full maximum amount allocated per prisoner per day as reimbursement of reasonable allowable costs for housing such prisoners and will not be required to provide documentation to the department regarding costs incurred beyond information necessary to determine the number of prisoner days for which the county is entitled to reimbursement.

HISTORY: Acts 1981, ch. 491, § 6; T.C.A., § 41-10-106; Acts 1984, ch. 896, § 3; 1985 (1st Ex. Sess.), ch. 5, §§ 46, 53; 1986, ch. 744, § 26; 1988, ch. 869, § 1; 1989, ch. 462, § 1; 1991, ch. 374, §§ 4, 5, 7; 2003, ch. 355, § 58; 2005, ch. 174, § 3; 2011, ch. 229, § 1.

Should government “servants” make 2, 3 and 4 times what the taxpayers make?

After looking at the salaries of several state government employees and having reviewed the payrolls of local governments, I sent this email to the Tennessee General Assembly.

Legislators,

As you hit the campaign trails, think about the impact that your actions have on the people that you are suppose to represent.

You’ve passed state mandated minimum salaries for office holders, including local elected officials and judges.  Those state mandated minimums are double, triple and even quadruple what the average salaries of taxpayers are.

For example: County Clerk, Register of Deeds, Trustee and the Property Assessor in Blount County will receive a salary of $82,801.

http://ctas.tennessee.edu/sites/default/files/2017%20Salary%20Schedule%20Final.pdf

Compare that to the working taxpayers of Blount County.  The average salary in 2013 was $42,731.  That means that your state mandated minimums are almost double the average salary.  Other elected officials such as the Highway Superintendent, Sheriff and Mayor will receive more than $82,801 and make more than double the average salary.

Perhaps the most disgusting salaries are those of the judges.  You’ve come up with a way to hide calling what you do a pay raise by saying they receive a cost of living increase.  Does someone making $161K need a cost of living increase, when the average salary is slightly more than 1/4 of what the judges are paid?

Why are the judges special?  Please don’t tell me that they have to be well paid to attract the best people.  The best people are often the ones who help people without compensation or for far less.  Those who run private practices may make more but they have no guaranteed salaries and also don’t have standard hours.  Please don’t tell me that judges work all the time because they have all kinds of staff doing work for them.  These judges locally, always have time to make all the special dinners to be treated as elite people in society.  There are plenty of people who work as many or more hours than judges and receive far less pay.

You passed legislation to add more to the court costs to fund these outrageous salaries when what you should have done is said these people already make enough and stop giving increases under a different description.

These salaries don’t reflect that in Blount County, they receive one of the best health care plans on the planet.  It is far better than what most private companies are offering.

What you have done with these state mandated minimums that are far more than the people earn is create a privileged class who have forgotten that it is their roles to serve, not to live lavish lifestyles off the hard work of the people.  Many of the people of Blount County, and likely of the entire state, resent that government officials are being paid far more than they make.

Stop the pay increases and the cost of living increases for these “servants” who are already making double, triple and quadruple what the people they are suppose to be serving are making.  These positions could easily go 5 years without a pay raise/cost of living increase and still make FAR MORE than the people that they are suppose to be serving.

Let freedom ring!