Blount County pay still not keeping up with the rate of inflation

Mayor Ed Mitchell is bragging about a budget without a tax increase and Circuit Court Clerk Tom Hatcher said the budget process was easy this year.  It’s no wonder that both are happy because they will both get nice raises and be paid substantially more than state law requires.  Hatcher will make 2.13 times the average 2014 salary of Blount County citizens.  Mitchell will make 2.95 times the 2014 average of $42,728.  Does anyone think that the Circuit Court Clerk and Mayor do double and triple the work of the average taxpayer struggling to pay their bills?

These two are patting each other on the back and padding their pockets with your money, while Blount County pay continues to fall below the rate of inflation.  With the 2014 numbers in, Blount County pay actually averaged a $3 drop compared to 2013, when adjusted for inflation.

From the East Tennessee Index:

What does this measure?

The average annual salary in a region in a given year, adjusted for inflation.

Why is this important?

Salaries are a gauge of overall economic health and a measure of the degree to which employees are sharing in the prosperity of a community. They also indicate the vitality of a region and its ability to compete and attract workers.

How is our region performing?

In 2014, the region’s average salary was $43,000, below the average for the state ($45,200) and the nation ($51,400). Since 2000, the region’s average salary increased by 6%, on par with growth nationally and but below statewide (7%). Roane County’s average annual pay grew by 26% over the same time period, more than any other county, while average salary fell in Blount and Sevier counties over that period (both less than 1% respectively). Between 2013 and 2014, the region’s average annual salary increased by 1%, on par with the state increase.

Notes about the data

Data presented in 2014 dollars.

In past years, Blount County was the only county in the region to average pay below the rate of inflation.  With Sevier County joining Blount, two counties that heavily promote tourism, we should be questioning how the governments’ heavy involvement in tourism promotion is actually benefiting its citizens.

With the repeated failures of the Blount Partnership, Chamber, Industrial Development Board and Smoky Mountain Tourism Development Authority (SMTDA) to foster an environment where average pay keeps up with the rate of inflation, it’s time for the commission to look at abolishing the SMTDA and letting the private sector promote its own tourist attractions.  The roughly $1.5 million that the SMTDA authority is getting from the hotel/motel tax should be used to help the citizens of Blount County by paying down some of the $232.8 million in liabilities (page 24) instead of being used to train gas station attendants (yes the former Tourism Director bragged about training gas station attendants) and give corporate welfare to a select few.

Don’t look for reform anytime soon though.  Commissioner and county school employee Gary Farmer was wearing his Blount Partnership shirt at the commission meeting Thursday evening.  As a commissioner, he gets to vote to fund money that is used for his regular pay raises as a school employee.  What’s inflation to someone with that power?

2 thoughts on “Blount County pay still not keeping up with the rate of inflation

  1. “As a commissioner, he gets to vote to fund money that is used for his regular pay raises as a school employee.”

    What’s more, the fact that the state’s largest employer IS THE STATE, with their automatic, mandated “maintenance of effort” raises, this skews the salary data even more. Non-government workers are further behind than these statistics show.

    • Yes, I thought about that as well. Next year, the 2015 numbers will include the county employees who received pay raises under the Evergreen Study and the School employees who get generous raises. It’s possible that we’ll see Blount County pay rise above the rate of inflation simply because county government employees got the raises while citizens in the private sector are living on even less because they’re paying higher taxes to fund government salaries.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *